Tips to Troubleshoot Your Heat Pump

Is your heat pump giving you trouble? The first step in fixing the problem is identifying the issue. Sometimes it is something simple you can fix yourself; other times it may take a professional to complete a repair. Here are some easy ways to troubleshoot and identify the problem to determine what steps are needed to restore complete function.

Airflow Isn’t Consistent

Does it seem like the airflow is low or are different rooms getting less or more air? If only a few rooms get less air, it may be a ductwork issue to those rooms or the vents could be dirty. Clean the vents; if this doesn’t improve airflow in those rooms, you may need the ducts inspected.

If airflow is low to all rooms, check your filter. It may be dirty or clogged and need changing. Low airflow can also be caused by dirty evaporator coils, which may need professional assistance to remedy.

Temperature Is Wrong

If your heat pump isn’t heating or cooling to the correct temperature, it may be on the wrong setting. Make sure the thermostat is set correctly. If the settings are correct, it is possible there is a problem with the thermostat or there is a refrigerant leak.

Heat Pump Will Not Turn On

If your heat pump is not working at all, make sure there is not an electrical issue. Check your fuse box and ensure the unit is getting electricity. If this does not resolve the issue, call your local HVAC service to have them inspect your unit.

The best way to keep your heat pump working year-round is with routine tune-ups from a professional and DIY maintenance like filter changes. Stay on top of maintenance to avoid complete shutdowns and unexpected repairs.

Posted on behalf of:
ClimateSmith, LLC
5950 Shiloh Road East
Alpharetta, GA 30005
(770) 475-9555

Furnace or Heat Pump – How to Decide

If you are building a new home or replacing your heat source in your existing home, you may be considering your options. Both heat pumps and furnaces are popular heat sources, each with their own benefits. But, there are differences and advantages, depending on what your needs are for your home. Here is a quick comparison of the two to outline the differences.

Heat Pumps

Heat pumps use the outdoor air to keep the home warm during the winter and cool during the summer. They do not use fuel for heat, but pull in heat from the air to heat the home, or pulls in cold air to cool it. Heat pumps warm the home like an air conditioner in reverse, and they can also cool a house during the summer. Heat pumps are energy efficient for climates that do not have extreme winter weather, offering a substantial energy savings.

Furnaces

Furnaces can offer a wonderful heat source, using oil, gas or electricity for fuel. Furnaces have one purpose – to heat the home. Furnaces burn fuel to make heat and distribute through the home, usually with a duct system. They are wonderful for cold weather, especially regions that often fall below freezing during the winter. However, they only heat and do need to be paired with an air conditioner for cooling during the summer for complete year-round climate control.

In a nut shell, heat pumps are an efficient option for regions that do not have severe winters, while a furnace can offer better heat for below freezing temperatures. Talk to your local HVAC service company to learn more about your heating options for your home.

Posted on behalf of:
ClimateSmith, LLC
5950 Shiloh Road East
Alpharetta, GA 30005
(770) 475-9555

Pros and Cons of Heat Pumps

Are you considering updating your heating system in your home? If a heat pump is on your list of options, it is important to know the benefits and disadvantages of this system of heating and cooling. Heat pumps are very popular in mild climates, but don’t work as well in climates with more dramatic season changes. Here are some of the pros and cons of owning a heat pump for your climate control needs.

Heat Pump Pros

The reason heat pumps are common in mild climates is that they use the outdoor air to generate heat or to cool the air. Mild air temperatures are easier for a heat pump to be efficient, especially when generating heat. Here are the pros of using a heat pump:

  • Efficiency. Heat pumps tend to be more energy efficient than furnaces. They can quickly convert air to heat using minimal amounts of electricity, often saving money on heating your home.
  • Heating and cooling. Heat pumps heat and cool the home, providing comfort in both the winter and summer months.
  • No fumes. While furnaces create dangerous fumes that need to be ventilated out of the home, heat pumps do not create carbon monoxide or other hazardous fumes.

Heat Pump Cons

While heat pumps are efficient, safe and convenient, they are not the best heating source for all climates. Here are a few of the cons of heat pumps:

  • Cold climates. If the outside temperatures consistently are below 40 degrees, heat pumps may have trouble heating to comfortable levels.
  • Electricity costs. In areas where electricity rates are high, the cost for using a heat pump versus a furnace may be more, especially if it is colder during the winter.

If you are still not sure if a heat pump is the best option for heating your home, talk to your local HVAC service company. They can discuss the benefits of all heat sources for your area and help you find the best one for your needs.

Posted on behalf of:
ClimateSmith, LLC
5950 Shiloh Road East
Alpharetta, GA 30005
(770) 475-9555

Why Upgrade to a Dual-Fuel Heat Pump?

Heat pumps are an energy efficient option for heating and cooling, but there are some drawbacks when the weather turns colder. While heat pumps are effective for heating when temperatures are above 35 degrees, when they dip colder, they may not offer the heating comfort you desire. Furnaces on the other hand offer excellent heat but are not as energy efficient. An alternative is a dual-fuel heat pump, that uses both options for maximum comfort and efficiency.

How Does a Dual-Fuel Heat Pump Work?

Heat pumps use the air from outside to cool or heat your home. They use much less energy than a furnace for heating and are efficient for air conditioning. A dual-fuel heat pump uses the heat pump function during the milder temperatures, offering a cost-effective option for heating your home. However, when it gets colder, it can switch to using a furnace for heating, offering more comfort.

A dual-fuel heat pump gives you the best of both systems. You get the efficiency of a heat pump during most of the year when temperatures are milder, especially spring and fall. This saves on energy bills compared to a furnace. However, when the weather gets colder, you will have the comfort and convenience of switching to more reliable heat from the furnace, but only when you need it.

A dual-fuel heat pump is one of the most efficient options for controlling the climate in your home year-round. If you are interested in learning more about how upgrading to a dual-fuel heat pump can benefit your home and energy bills, contact your local HVAC installer to get the details.

Posted on behalf of:
Western Aire Heating & Cooling
264 Buchanan Highway
Dallas, GA 30157
(770) 505-7426

Benefits of Owning a Heat Pump

If you are considering upgrading your HVAC system, you may have wondered whether a heat pump could have advantages over a traditional heating and air conditioning system. Of course, air quality and comfort are important, so you want to ensure that the system you choose will give you and your family the environment you prefer. Here are some benefits that heat pumps offer to help you determine if this system would be a better choice for your home.

  • Energy efficiency. Heat pumps can offer savings on your energy bill. Heating costs can be reduced by up to 40% versus electrically heat.
  • Safe surfaces. Heat pumps do not create hot surfaces that can create an unsafe environment. This reduces fire hazards and burn possibilities for small children or pets.
  • Environmentally-friendly. Heat pumps do not use fuels that can harm the environment – no gas, wood, smoke or oils, just a transfer of air to heat or cool your home.
  • Lower humidity. The transfer of air allows for better control of humidity in your home. The air is automatically circulated and excess moisture in the air is collected in the unit as it passes through, draining outside to keep humidity levels low.
  • Temperature control. Heat pumps can bring in warm air or work in reverse to release warm air for temperature control. Use automatic settings to control when the pump is turned on for better energy efficiency.

Heat pumps are great for mild climates when winters are not too severe and summer heat is not overbearing. To learn more about the benefits of heat pumps and to determine if they are a good fit for your home, talk to your local HVAC service provider.

Posted on behalf of:
Western Aire Heating & Cooling
Marietta, GA 30066
(770) 505-7426

Heat Pump Not Blowing Warm Air?

Heat pumps can be wonderful when they work the way they are intended. Cool air during the warm months and warm air when it is cold outside. But what do you do when the temperature drops and your heat pump is not giving you the warmth you need? Here are some troubleshooting tips to help you find the problem.

  • Is the thermostat working? One of the main reasons a heat pump is not providing warm air is due to a thermostat problem. Try setting the temperature on the heat pump a few degrees above the current temp in the house and turn the fan on. If the fan comes on but there is no warm air, it may be the thermostat.
  • No fan? If you turned the temperature up and turned the fan on but the fan does not engage, there are a few different things it may be. First check your breaker box to ensure the fuse was not tripped for the heat pump. If the fuse was tripped, you could have a blower motor, wiring or control panel issue. If the breaker is fine, it could be the blower motor.
  • Outdoor unit. If the fan is running but no heat is coming out, try setting your heat pump thermostat to emergency heat. Set the temperature at least five degrees above the current temp and see if warm air comes out the vents. If it does, there could be an issue with your outdoor unit.

Whatever the problem may be, you will need the help of an experienced HVAC service. If you have not had routine maintenance on your heat pump, schedule a tune-up to find out exactly what the heating problem is and have it fixed by a professional.

Posted on behalf of:
ClimateSmith, LLC
5950 Shiloh Road East
Alpharetta, GA 30005
(770) 475-9555

Winter Heat Pump Troubleshooting

If the temperature has dropped outdoors and your heat pump is not warming up your home, you may be facing a heating problem. But is it something you need to call your local HVAC service company to repair? Before you make a service call, do a little troubleshooting to see if it is something as simple as a blown fuse. Here are a few troubleshooting tips for a heat pump that is not heating your home.

  • Check the thermostat. Begin your troubleshooting at the thermostat to check where the temperature is set. Try moving it up a few degrees above the current temp to see if the unit turns on and whether it blows hot air.
  • Turn the fan on. If the fan does not come on, it could be a blown fuse. If the breaker is tripped, you may have a blown blower motor, bad wiring or the control board. If the breaker is not tripped, it may be the fan relay or the thermostat.
  • Check the heat. If the fan turns on, switch to emergency heat. If the unit blows warm air, the problem is most likely with the outside unit. If the fan is on but there is no heat, the thermostat may need to be replaced or it could be in your air handler.

If it is not something as simple as the thermostat being set incorrectly or a blown fuse, you will most likely need to call your local HVAC service company to fix the issue. Keep in mind that regular heat pump maintenance and inspections can help reduce emergency repairs and catch problems before they start and you are left in the cold.

Posted on behalf of:
ClimateSmith, LLC
Buford, GA
(770) 475-9528

Energy Efficiency Benefit Of Heat Pumps

While the classic combination of air conditioning and a furnace may be necessary for regions with hot summers and cold winters, homeowners in many regions can save money by owning a heat pump. This is particularly true of the southern regions, which typically have mild winters paired with hot summers. Heat pumps use less energy to operate, especially in the winter, offering substantial energy savings for many homeowners. 

How Heat Pumps Work

What makes a heat pump efficient is its ability to use the warm air both inside and outside a home to cool or heat the interior air as needed. During the summer, heat pumps absorb hot air and transfer it outside to cool the inside of the home. In the winter, the exact opposite is true, with heat pumps absorbing heat from outside and transferring inside to warm the air. 

This absorption of warmth is more energy efficient, especially in the winter. Instead of needing excessive amounts of gas or electricity to warm the air like a furnace, the heat pump is utilizing the warm air already available. In regions that rarely see temperatures below freezing, heat pumps can be an effective and efficient option to keep indoor air comfortable all year round. 

For homeowners in moderate winter climates, choosing a heat pump over other HVAC options may save on monthly energy bills while still providing their homes with the perfect temperatures throughout the summer and winter. To determine whether a heat pump may be a good option for your home, talk to your local HVAC service professional to schedule an assessment of your current system versus the many heat pumps that are available.

Posted on behalf of James Smith, ClimateSmith LLC

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Heat Pumps Versus Air Conditioning

As summer approaches, those of you who are considering different ways to stay cool this summer may be shopping for a new cooling system for your home. There are two main types of cooling systems, either an air conditioning system or a heat pump. While both systems will cool your home during the summer, it is the heating factor that can determine which will be the best option for your home. Here are three factors to consider: 

  • Winter temperatures. For those who live in a mild climate with moderate winters, a heat pump can be the most efficient option. While heat pumps are not designed to heat well in frigid temperatures, they are fine for heating on cool days when temperatures hover around 50 degrees. For colder winters, a furnace will offer more efficient heat, paired with either a heat pump in a dual system, or a central air conditioner for summer.
     
  • Humidity. For climates with high humidity, heat pumps can offer both heating, cooling and humidity control, while air conditioning does not. For many homeowners in the southeast regions of the U.S., a heat pump system can be the best option.
     
  • Energy efficiency. Heat pumps can offer substantial energy savings over a furnace and air conditioning unit in mild climates. The energy used to heat on cool days with a heat pump can save up to 40% off your electricity bill. However, in cold temperatures, a furnace is more efficient. 

Both systems can offer refuge from the hot summer days ahead, but it most likely will be the heating aspect that will determine your choice of cooling system. Talk to your local HVAC professional about options for your home to learn more about which system will best meet your needs. 

Posted on behalf of James Smith, ClimateSmith LLC

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Heat Pump Thermostats

Homeowners are always looking for a way to reduce their energy consumption either to do their part for the environment or just to save money on their utility bills.  Installing an energy saving thermostat called a set-back thermostat or programmable thermostat is a popular alternative for energy conscious homeowners.  These thermostats can be programmed to raise or lower the temperature setting in your home to cut down on energy costs at night and while the house sits empty during the day. 

Programmable thermostats are an excellent energy saving alternative for many types of home heating and cooling systems, but if your home is heated and cooled with a heat pump, you should probably think twice before investing in a programmable thermostat.  You may not see much of a savings when your heat pump is operating in the heat mode, and it’s even possible that you could end up using more energy to heat your home rather than saving energy.

A heat pump works just like a central air conditioning system in the summer and a programmable thermostat will produce a similar energy savings when the heat pump is operating in cooling mode.  However, when the heat pump is operating in heating mode, it is very energy efficient but slow to respond to changes in your thermostat temperature setting. 

When your programmable thermostat calls for a sudden increase in the temperature, most heat pumps use expensive electric auxiliary heating strips to meet the sudden demand for heat.  The result is a quick increase in the temperature, but the high energy use of the auxiliary heating strips will wipe out and energy savings from the programmable thermostat.

For energy efficient heating with a  heat pump, most experts agree that the best policy regarding the thermostat is to “set it and forget it.”  You can still save on your air conditioning costs using a programmable thermostat with your heat pump, but the savings from just the air conditioning may not be enough to offset the cost of the thermostat.

Posted on behalf of James Smith, ClimateSmith LLC

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