Solving the Mystery of Temperature Fluctuations Throughout Your Home

Does it seem like some rooms in your home are always a little warmer or cooler than the rest? It can be frustrating to have uneven temperatures throughout your home and it could be costing you more on your energy bills. Temperature fluctuations between zones or rooms in your home can be caused by many different issues, making it a mystery for some homeowners. Here are some common contributors to this issue to help you solve the climate-control mystery.

Location of the Thermostat

Every room has different impacts on the temperature. Rooms on one side of the home may get morning sunshine, while the other side warms up in the afternoon. Where the thermostat is located in relation to these factors can impact the different temperatures felt in each room.

A zoning system with sensors in each room can alleviate this issue. This can be accomplished with dampers in ductwork that cut off rooms that are too warm or too cold due to their location. Mini-splits can also be used to create single zones.

Ductwork Difficulties

One of the main reasons for fluctuations in temperature in different rooms is ductwork issues. Before the early 2000’s, many ductwork systems were installed without the right framework and support, leading to leaks down the road. This can account for many differences in temperature from room to room and also means air is coming in or leaking out, creating less efficiency.

To determine the reason for your temperature fluctuations, contact your local HVAC service and have an energy evaluation and inspection completed on your system. Not only can fixing these issues create improved comfort in your home, it can lower your energy bills for substantial savings.

Posted on behalf of:
ClimateSmith, LLC
1925 Lena Carter Road
Buford, GA 30519
(770) 475-9528

Adding Heat and Air to Home Additions

Are you expanding your home? Whether you are adding on another bedroom, bathroom or even expanding your garage, you want to ensure these new spaces have adequate climate control. However, depending on where you are at in your remodel, it may be tricky or expensive to connect new additions to your existing HVAC system. Here are some HVAC solutions to consider at different stages of remodeling.

Planning Stage

If you have not begun building your addition, you still have options. It is easier to connect your new space to your existing HVAC if the construction has not started. Consult with your HVAC provider to determine how much it would cost to add more duct work to connect the new room.

Mid-Construction

If you have already begun to build, it may not be too late to add in duct work. Talk to your contractor and local HVAC installer about the difficulty of connecting your new room. If you are adding on to your garage, this can be a great opportunity to add climate control to this area.

Post-Construction

For additions that are already in place, you can still add air and heat with a mini-split. This is also an option in the planning and mid-construction phases. These isolated HVAC units do not require duct work and are efficient for climate control in rooms that may not need heat or air all the time, like a garage.

It is easier to connect a new space to your HVAC system before construction is completed, but it can always be added later. Mini-splits can be an economical option when adding new duct work can be labor intensive. Talk to your local HVAC installer for options to get the air and heat you need for your new addition.

Posted on behalf of:
ClimateSmith, LLC
1925 Lena Carter Road
Buford, GA 30519
(770) 475-9528

Ductless Mini Split HVAC Systems

Ductless mini split heating and cooling systems are a great new alternative to traditional ducted HVAC systems.  A mini split system is similar to a modern heat pump, but as the name implies it does not use any ducts to distribute the heated or cooled air.

A ductless mini split system uses an outdoors compressor/condenser like a heat pump, but indoors it uses a separate individual air handler for each room instead of a central air handler with ducts to blow the air to each room like a heat pump or furnace.  Mini-split systems can have anywhere from one to four indoor air handlers for each outdoor unit.

Mini split systems are an excellent alternative to replace older ductless heating systems such as water or oil filled radiators, space heaters, or radiant panels.  They are easy to install and only require a three inch hole in the wall to connect indoor air handler to the outdoor unit.

They are also an excellent choice for installation in room additions where extending the ducting would be impractical or where the existing HVAC system would not be large enough to heat and cool the additional space.

Because they do not rely on ducts for air distribution, mini split systems are very efficient.  Traditional central heat and air conditioning systems can lose as much as 30% of their heating and cooling energy through the duct system.  Also, each indoor air handler in a mini split system has a separate thermostat.  Each room can be heated or cooled depending on how it is used resulting in further energy savings.